WRESTLING HERITAGE

A hobby site created by enthusiasts of 
British wrestling celebrating wrestling and 
wrestlers from 1930 onwards through 
fifty glorious years of British wrestling history

S: Page 14 of 17

Wrestling Heritage A-Z

  See all wrestlers in section S

Les Stent ... Ray Stevens ... Pete Stewart ... Vic Stewart ... Eugene Stezycki ... Billy Stock ... Jim Stockdale ... Mike "The Doc" Stocks ... More ... 

Les Stent

 

In  April 1962 the editor of The Wrestler magazine Charles Mascall reminisced “Some of the top stars thrilling fans all over the land.” 

Alongside the names Vic Hessle, The Farmer, Ernie Baldwin and Jim Hussey was “The Young Apollo” Les Stent.  Unlike the aforementioned stars Welshman Les, twice a British champion,  has until now been been surprisingly overlooked by fans recalling the Heritage Years.

This oversight is certainly not due to lack of skill because  Les Stent was a British champion and  vanquisher of George Kidd, Jack Dempsey, Alan Colbeck and just about every other top ranking lighter man of the 1940s and 1950s.

We are pleased to put right the shortcomings of the past and add Les Stent to our Personality Parade.

Friends and family knew him as a gentle man; until he stepped foot into the wrestling ring that is. Les Stent was one of the toughest of men to set foot in the ring with a punishing, aggressive nature that failed to disguise the wrestling skills of a master technician.

 

Everyone can read our extended tribute: The Gentle Man of Wrestling

Ray Stevens 

Yorkshire's Ray Stevens was a familiar figure on the independent circuit from the mid 1960s onwards, a regular worker for Cyril Knowles and other northern promoters. Like so many others it was a night at the wrestling that got Ray hooked. His older brother regularly went along to the fortnightly shows in Halifax. One night Ray went along with him and was mesmerised by the local favourites on the bill that night, Max, Brian and Shirley Crabtree. Max and Albert Wall were to remain the two wrestlers that Ray admired the most.

From that time on Ray was determined to become a wrestler himself and trained hard at the Hilltop Amateur Wrestling Club until given the chance to prove himself in the professional rings by the independent promoters. With Romeo Joe Critchley already well known he dropped his family name of Peter Critchley in favour of Ray Stevens, reminiscent of the American heavyweight of that name. 

Promoter Cyril Knowles   gave  Ray his first opportunity in the professional ring, a match against fellow Yorkshire man Al Marshall. Ray recalls that the money he received for that match didn't even cover his petrol money, but he didn't care; he was a wrestler and that was all that mattered. Within a short time he was working for numerous independent promoters around the country. 

Ray came to the attention of Joint Promotions and was signed up to work for them in 1971. National exposure came his way when featured in the July, 1971, issue of The Wrestler magazine, followed  in August, 1973, when he made his television debut against Phil Pearson at the Newark Sports Centre. Ray was unfortunate to go down to Phil Pearson by the only fall required on that occasion, in which Kendo Nagasaki knocked out Tibor Szakacs in the main event. 

Ray loved his wrestling, and gives specific mentions of the times he enjoyed working with Johnny Saint, Roy St Clair and Kid McCoy. The pressure was always on to travel further afield which did lead to conflict. Although a busy worker over many years Ray, like most others, wrestled on a part time business. He and his brother went into partnership with a bakery business. They did well and the business was thriving. Ray had to prioritise and devoted his time to the business. "I loved wrestling, but to be a star you have to devote all your time to it. I did not have the time."

Pete Stewart

Tall and slim Peter Stewart started wrestling professionally around 1964, but it was a couple of years later that we first came across him at our local hall.

In those days he was often accompanied by his father, Vic Stewart, but in the world of magic and mirrors that is professional wrestling they were billed at the Stewart brothers. In the mid sixties one of the Sunday newspapers revealed they weren't brothers at all, but father and son. Shock and horror! Did we care? Not a bit.

Not that Stewart was their name either. Peter Stewart was born Peter Ernest Lawler, and adopted his father's ring name. By the mid sixties the Stewarts were tangling regularly with the likes of the Royal brothers and the Black Diamonds.

We read harsh words about him in The Wrestler magazine that don't tally with our memories of a clean skilful wrestler. By 1969 when father Vic retired from the ring Peter was well and truly ready to fly the nest. By then he was demonstrating that he could hold his own, though not necessarily beat, the likes of Billy Joyce and Mike Marino.  Like the majority of wrestlers he remained  a good, honest worker who never reached the top flight but throughout the 1970s and into the 1980s Peter Stewart remained a  value for money heavyweight who was a good addition to any bill. 

Vic Stewart
We loved our tag team wrestling in the 1960s.  Oh, how we loved it when the high flying speedy Stewart brothers outfoxed their villainous opponents the Cadmans, the Donlevys,the Rawlings  and the Black Diamonds.  Until, shock horror, one of the Sunday newspapers exposed the fact that Vic and Pete Stewart were not brothers at all, but  father and son. 
 
Did we care?
 
Not a jot. If the Sunday newspaper thought that this piece of minor deception would undermine our belief in the sport they were to be sadly mistaken. All it did succeed in doing was demonstrate that Vic Stewart was a man who had extended his youth. He was quite believable as Pete's older brother as we watched him speed his way around the ring outfoxing men many years younger. Vic Stewart was a very skilful wrestler.
 
A technician who worked within the rules aided by  a youthful appearance that made him immensely popular with fans. Vic Stewart turned professional in the early 1950s and from the beginning found himself opposing established favourites that included Jack Beaumont, Martin Conroy, Tommy Pye, and Cyril Morris. The boy had class, and when Joint Promotions were formed in 1952  Vic was signed up to work exclusively for their members, making a rare Royal Albert Hall appearance in 1954 against Spencer Churchill. We note that the following night he was on the bill at Willenhall Baths, a stark reminder that false delusions had no place in professional wrestling .
 
With his work  mostly limited to the Midlands and north of England Vic worked for all Joint Promotion members, but most often  for Wryton Promotions.  In December 1957 Vic was tempted by offers from the independent promoters and dallied with the opposition for a year before returning to Joint Promotions in November 1958. Vic appealed to a national audience on television wrestling during the early 1960s, making his debut in September, 1959, against John Allan.  Further televised opponents included Les Kellett, The Great Togo, Bill Howes, Quasimodo, Ernie Riley and Alf Cadman. Not an easy set of opponents.
 
Vic continued to work regularly throughout the 1950s and 1960s, mainly in singles contests and occasionally with various tag partners until 1964. In 1964 Vic's son, Peter,  appeared on the scene. He was an immediate success and promoters took the opportunity to team Vic and Peter together as the Stewart brothers, testimony to Vic's youthful appearance. They quickly established themselves as one of the country's top tag teams alongside the Royals, Black Diamonds, White Eagles and McManus/Logan.  After twenty years in the business Vic Stewart retired from British wrestling in the early 1970's
Eugene Stezycki

Polish heavyweight Eugene Stezycki is best remembered for his feud with legendary British heavyweight Bert Assirati. Having served in the Polish army and survived a German labour camp during the war Stezycki came to Britain and set up home in Bristol.

With a sportig background of weight lifting, boxing and wrestling he chose the latter  as his career  and began wrestling professionally  in 1954, aged 30.

His early career was pretty unspectacular, but all that changed in July, 1956 when he gave Bert Assirati a tremendous tussle in Brighton, and once again at Belle Vue a few weeks later.

From that time on Stezycki’s place in wrestling was established, and that place was often in the opposite corner of Assirati. He wrestled Assirati almost fifty times over the following three years, one of the most memorable being a particularly bloody European title clash at the Seymour Hall on 15th December 1958.

These bouts established Eugene Stezycki  as one of the toughest wrestlers in British rings. Stezycki died on 19th July, 2007. 

Billy Stock

Born in Notting Hill and later living in Ewell, Surrey, Billy Stock was a popular 1960s wrestler.  A keen swimmer he was a life guard before turning professional wrestler.
 
He began wrestling as an amateur at the Foresters AWC before turning professional in 1961. Usually sticking within the rules Billy could let the fury fly when he felt the situation required it. His all action style appealed to wrestling fans, particularly in the south where he mostly appeared.

His style was not always textbook stuff and he specialised in strength holds.

In the 1980s he was known to don a mask and wrestle as The Assassin.

Billy Stock passed away suddenly in September, 2010

Jim Stockdale (The Blue Angel)

The plumber turned wrestler from Stockton on Tess, Gentleman Jim Stockdale, entertained fans mainly in the north of England both under his own name and that of the villainous masked man The Blue Angel.

Jim took an interest in wrestling during his teenage years whilst he was serving an apprenticeship at Head Wrightsons Apprentice School. 

In his early twenties he began to wrestle professionally, and one of the highlights of his career came in November, 1956, when he was the plucky local boy who narrowly lost by a KO decision to Mike Marino at the New St James Hall, Newcastle.

Opponents during a career which spanned the best part of two decades, from the early fifties to the end of the 1960s, also included well known names such as Steve Veidor, Dai Sullivan, Cyril Morris and Bobby Graham.

Amongst the many wrestlers who were influenced by Stockdale were “Boy” Devlin, Tommy Stones and Arthur Openshaw all of whom were amongst those he trained at his gymnasium behind the Grey Horse Pub, where his father Charlie Stockdale was landlord.

In 1968 Jim and his family left the North East and moved to Lincolnshire where his wrestling career continued for a few years more.

Unbeknown to fans there was another side to this popular wrestler. There was no shortage of masked wrestlers on the independent shows of the 1960s. One that stood out from the crowd was the villainous Blue Angel. Even before he entered the ring fans were in no doubt that here was a scoundrel of the first order.

The costume and body language conveyed the message of skulduggery as he moved little by little towards the ring.  A sombre, scruffy, full length cloak made the heavyweight easy to place in the first class villain division. If that wasn’t enough there was always the bell that he rang out aloud like the Hunchback of Notre Dame. For good measure The Blue Angel would drag his leg, allegedly the result of an horrific accident that had somehow resulted in the acquisition of superhuman powers.

Fans would jeer him as he unhurriedly made his way towards the ring and the forlorn figure would stop to return the compliment with a snarl.  The man beneath the mask was the popular Stockton wrestler Jim Stockdale who was nothing like his mysterious masked persona.

Take note of the poster on the right where the cash conscious promoter uses Jim twice on the same show, masked and maskless.

As years passed by Jim’s fame moved into a new sphere as he left behind the world of championship wrestling to become the owner of champion pigeons!