WRESTLING HERITAGE

A hobby site created by enthusiasts of 
British wrestling celebrating wrestling and 
wrestlers from 1930 onwards through 
fifty glorious years of British wrestling history

M: Morgan - Morlans

Wrestling Heritage A - Z

Dave Morgan (Dave Evans, Dai Morgan)
Welsh mid heavyweight Dave Morgan was another of those bright young things that came through the ranks in the 1960s when he was a regular worker in Dale Martin rings.  Born in Tonypandy, South Wales, Dave and his family moved to Middlesex whilst he was a child. He joined Forresters Amateur Wrestling Club when he was fourteen years old and  three years later he turned professional, using the names Dave Evans, Dai Morgan and Dave Morgan. He settled on the latter and by  1968 he was a well known figure amongst wrestling fans. However,  the youngster had wanderlust. It was France first, but that was only the beginning and by the end of the decade we were beginning to see less and less of him in British rings. Dave went on to find his  greatest success of all in the rings of the United States and Germany, where he set up home as a wrestler and promoter until retirement in 1999. Dave died on 1st June, 2004.

Ellis Morgan
Ellis Morgan appears on our radar in the second half of  the 1950s and we have many records of appearances working for independent  promoters. Most of these contests are in the north west of England, but he does venture to London for Devereux Promotions. A frequent opponent was Al Brown (wrestling as Frank Sparks in those days), and others included Pete Lindbergh, Ken Else, Terry Downs and Jack Santos. He disappears around 1961, leaving us to wonder if he went on to greater fame under another guise.

Jim Morgan
The other half of the Fabulous Harlequins, see the item on brother Scott below.  Fast and skilful wrestler trained at the Mossblown Gym alongside Big Ian Miller, Scott Thomson and Jeff Bradley. Jim worked regularly around Scotland for Spartan Promotions, Orig Williams, Andy Robin, Max Crabtree, Jack Atherton and Relwyskow & Green.   Usually seen in tag matches with brother David and known collectively as The Fabulous Harlequins or The Morgan Twins.  Always the good guys, fans enjoyed them most when facing the bad boys like Adrian Street and Bobby Barnes, and masked men Les Diables Rouges and the team of The Viking and The Scorpion..

Jim left wrestling in the 1980s to become a successful breeder of horses.


Johnny Morgan
One time professional boxer Johnny Morgan turned to wrestling in the 1950s, tackling the likes of Jack Beaumont, Jim Foy, Bert Assirati and Gordon Nelson. He also used his sporting experiences as an author, writing The Square Jungle, based on his experience as a professional boxer and  Nothing Barred in which he turns his attention to wrestling, and writes a novel about the corrupt world of professional wrestling. This is a gritty, dramatic story far removed from the cheers of the fans down at the Shoreditch Town Hall.


Les Morgan
Warrington's Les Morgan wrestled around the halls of the north during the 1960s. Les shared his working life between wrestling, his trade as a welder at the nearby Unilever factory and doorman at the Lion Hotel in Bridge Street, Shane Fenton's (Alvin Stardust's) Nite Spot in Mersey Street, and the Carlton Club in Sankey Street,  Warrington. If you are out there Les, or any family members, do get in touch.

Scott Morgan
A popular lightweight who whizzed around the Scottish independent circuit in the 1970s. Trained at the Mossblown gyn of Dale Storm  teenager David Simpson (that was his family name) and his brother, Jim, were two of the best to come out of the Mossblown gym and worked regularly around Scotland for Spartan Promotions, Orig Williams, Andy Robin, Max Crabtree, Jack Atherton and Relwyskow & Green.  He was a real flier,  fast and skilfull too. Usually seen in tag matches with brother Jim and known collectively as The Fabulous Harlequins or The Morgan Twins.  Always the good guys, fans enjoyed them most when facing the bad boys like Adrian Street and Bobby Barnes, and masked men Les Diables Rouges and the team of The Viking and The Scorpion..

Scott drifted out of wrestling in the early 1989s, opting to travel the world when he got a job in the oil industry.

Brendan Moriarty
Tough  Manchester based Irish middleweight worked for the independent promoters of the north and the midlands in the 1960s and 1970s. Opposed top independent men such as Eddie Rose, Pete Lindbergh, Jack Martin and Johnny South whilst working for opposition promoters Grant Foderingham, Jack Taylor, Jack Cassidy, Danny Flynn and Fred Woolley.

Julien Morice
French lightweight champion from Toulouse but largely domiciled in Britain from 1961.  Real name Pierre Maurice Julien.  He had been lightweight weightlifting record holder of France 1950 to 1952 and went on in 1955 to defeat Modesto Aledo for the European lightweight wrestling championship.  Lost and regained his national and European titles, only to have to relinquish them when called up for the French army during the Algerian campaign in the late fifties.  A great success rate during his early sixties peak in the UK and a credible opponent for George Kidd in many lightweight classics.  His sapping backbreaker was legendary.  

Feuded for a while with Mick McManus.  Tagged for a short while with Al Miquet as the Entente Cordiale.  His main tag claim to fame was participation alongside Zoltan Boscik in the first ever tag match at the Royal Albert Hall, where the international pairing went down to the Cortez Brothers.

Approachable to fans in his horn-rimmed glasses, we were always assured of stylish technique when this tiniest of wrestlers was on the bill.  Slipped noticeably in stature in the seventies, losing at the bottom of a Royal Albert Hall bill to Al Nicol.  Stoutly championed by a proud son-in-law on current day forums, who calls into doubt Morice's alleged interest in the occult.

Antonio Morlans
Spanish heavyweight from  Zarragossa visited Britain in 1962 and again in 1965. Lost to Steve Veidor at the Royal Albert Hall. Faced other top class opposition around the country but was often on the losing end.