WRESTLING HERITAGE

A hobby site created by enthusiasts of 
British wrestling celebrating wrestling and 
wrestlers from 1930 onwards through 
fifty glorious years of British wrestling history

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Wrestling Heritage A-Z

 See all wrestlers in section G

Al Garmain ... Juan Garmo ... Jimmy Garner ... Bill Garnon ... Nobby Garside ... Stan Garside ... More...

Al Garmain

Parisien heavyweight visited Britain in 1961 and 1962 for Dale Martin Promotions, wrestling the top mid heavies and heavyweights of the time. Lost to Johnny Czeslaw at the Royal Albert Hall.

Please get in touch if you can provide more information.

Juan Garmo

We have just two recorded matches for Liverpool's Juan Garmo (known as Mr Coney Island), real name John McIntosh, one in 1947 and one in 1948.

Information is being sought by his grandaughter, Kim, and Heritage reader Terry Nelson.

 

 

Please get in touch if you can provide more information.

Jimmy Garner

The heavyweight from West Ham turned professional in 1957 and wrestled for Dale Martin Promotions throughout the south for six years before disappearing from the wrestling scene.

Please get in touch if you can provide more information.

Bulldog Bill Garnon

The word solid could have been invented for Fishguard’s Bulldog Bill Garnon. He  made a name for himself as one of the Britain’s  top heavyweights in the 1930s, but his successful career continued many years post war.  

Legend states that he was encouraged to learn to wrestle after a promoter witnessed him lifting train wheels whilst at work. He wrestled many world class performers of his day, including Jack Sherry, Karl Pojello, and Dick Shikat.  Garnon has the distinction of being one of the first two wrestlers to appear in the UK wrestling under freestyle rules introduced by Atholl Oakeley, when he opened the first programme at Lane’s Club in London.

In the 1930s Garnon accompanied Athol Oakeley to the USA and Cuba, which was quite an achievement in those pre-war days.  In his first New York bout he defeated Wong Bok Cheung, the Chinese wrestler. 

For a time  in the 1930s Garnon was British Heavyweight Champion. He  won  the title when he defeated Athol Oakeley at White City with a knockout in the last round. He lost the title to Douglas Clarke at Belle Vue, Manchester.  

Bill Garnon moved from his Fishguard home to Bolton in the 1950s. He was seriously injured when hit by a bus, which ended his career and took him back to Fishguard where he lived with his brother, Dai. In 2008 a slate plaque was unveiled in his memory at Fishguard Town Hall. Bill Garnon died in 1979, aged 72.

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Stan Garside

 

 

Huddersfield  light heavyweight Stan Garside wrestled in Britain between 1933 and 1951. In the 1930s, when wrestling could be very rough, Stan was an athletic skilfull worker who travelled the length and breadth of Britain, facing the likes of Bully Pye, Val Cerino and Vic Coleman.War broke out in 1939 and we have only one recorded match for Stan during the war years, presumably he had other things on his mind.

 

With the arrival of peace it seems that Stan was eager to resume his career, and like many other British wrestlers he worked in Singapore and Malaysia  in 1946 and 1947.  The photo above (centre) shows Stan fighting for the Light heavyweight Championship of Malaysia. The poster on the left advertises Stan topping the bill at the Great World Arena, Singapore. Wrestling was held every Saturday night at the Great World Arena.

By the summer of 1947 Stan was back in Britain wrestling mostly in the north and midlands against top class opposition such as Jack Dale, Mike Marino and Billy Joyce.

Stan  retired in 1951 and  took up refereeing. The photo above right shows Stan refereeing a British heavyweight championship elimination contest in which Ernie Baldwin attempts to pin Ron Jackson. Ernie went on to be crowned the first Lord Mountevans Heavyweight Champion.

Following retirement Stan also bought a string of hotels in Huddersfield which included The Swan near the railway station where he received regular famous guests.

Stan and his wife, Ann, then moved to south-west Scotland to Gatehouse of Fleet and ran the Bayhorse Antiques shop for a number of years.

Stan Garside died in 2005. 

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