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Forum Home > Talk Wrestling > 1971 offscreen footage of TV wrestling, feat Naggers, Billy Howes, Pete Roberts. Also a rare glimpse of the closing titles/credits of the midweek late night wrestling.

David Mantell
Member
Posts: 2220

https://www.facebook.com/david.mantell.52/videos/1925781620772074

Enjoy!

November 4, 2017 at 9:01 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Ron Historyo
Member
Posts: 1477

David Mantell at November 4, 2017 at 9:01 AM

https://www.facebook.com/david.mantell.52/videos/1925781620772074

Enjoy!

Fantastic memories that I lived through.

Note Kendo in those days did not use the Crash.

The electric of his menace was there again for me .

Thanks for an absolute gem.

--

HISTORYO

Time Detective and Multi Heritage Award Winner

November 4, 2017 at 11:41 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Bill Smith
Member
Posts: 602

David Mantell at November 4, 2017 at 9:01 AM

https://www.facebook.com/david.mantell.52/videos/1925781620772074

Enjoy!

Must agree with Ron..Thanks

November 4, 2017 at 4:47 PM Flag Quote & Reply

David Mantell
Member
Posts: 2220

Kendo learned the Crash while in Stampede in 1972.


He does use the Aeroplane Spin on Pete Roberts.  Both the Aeroplane Spin and the Kamikaze Crash are variants on the Fireman's Carry Takedown.


Notice also he scissors the wrist of Roberts as soon as he's got him down in the side headlock, as mentioned in my analysis of the Lee Bronson match.  I think there may just be a glimpse of the end of him doing his slow majestic cross buttock throw to get Roberts down in the headlock.


Notice also the mask did not come off completely, contrary to what some people insisted on here a few years back - it actually hangs from the top of his head like a swimming cap when he walks off in disgust.  Note also that Thornley appears to have a beard at this point.


Also, to pick up on a point from another thread, is the referee seen counting towards the camera Joe D'Orazio?


Also, what theme did the late night shows have?  Was it the same theme as the pre-WoS b/w titles as seen in The Final Bell?

November 5, 2017 at 4:10 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Anglo Italian
Moderator
Posts: 1727

Certainly Joe D'Orazio and other officials seen are Tony Mancelli, John Harris and in the main bout Ken Lazenby.


As Ron and I have both described in detail,, Nagasaki pre-George Gilette was another wrestler, still keen to make his mark.  I was minded of another move he used in the sixties that he does here against Judo Pete:  pushing the man against the ropes and catching him back with crossed arms.  Not very harmful but was special when I fist saw it a few years before these tv shows.


The aeroplane spin is superb, isn't it?


This film was on Youtube, about four years ago.  Grainy then, I think posted by our former member friend NoStrOmo who won a very early quiz of ours.  It was deleted.  Looks like this is a film from screen of that grainy footage.


Not sure about any beard, David, I really don't think so.  But I can tell you that late sixties Nagasaki had a blond pony tail openly visibly for about 8 inches down his neck.


True he puts the mask back on top of his head, but I think this was supposedly to cover up the tattoo (which he had probably just had done especially for this bout ☺;)  I do believe the mask came off fully but would not want to be too assertive after 46 years.


The tattoo is something we never really discuss.    At the time it was a big deal as we pondered what its significance might have been.  Can anyone shine any light on the detail of that tattoo now that it has had so much exposure?


Thanks David.

--

Still trying to work out what was going on!

November 5, 2017 at 1:47 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Ron Historyo
Member
Posts: 1477

The crossed arms move was sometimes finished as "The Rack".

I can't tell you about the tattoo as I had no memory of Naggers being bald until 1977.

But never a beard , it was regular that people would get the mask above the chin. Everyone started to do it. Anyone that did it was a nearly , giving the crowd what they wanted and the promoters an easily justified return match in the hope that the crowd would believe that the next time it would be off.

Bill Howes was one of the greatest antagonists and I saw at least three other matches with him and Kendo , one a fantastic violent Judo Jacket match at Belle Vue that went a long time , ebbed and flowed with Kendo eventually making Howes tap out , I think maybe to a choke hold. (could be wrong , as Anglo says , a long time ago)

As I stated Kendo could not get Billy's European belt off him while he was still light enough because he could not prove he was European. Consequently matches for side stakes were another ruse.

I also would like to say that I liked Kendo's original masks with thinner bars on . They went big and bold and several colours but for me it did nothing. I say it again , with all that weight in the 1980's he was never even close to being the same wrestler.

Once he came out of black , he was never quite so menacing for me.

My memory also seems to recall that the mask in the Howes fight did not come clean off but showed all his face , however some hair got in the way , enough to not see him clearly enough to spot in the street.


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HISTORYO

Time Detective and Multi Heritage Award Winner

November 5, 2017 at 2:18 PM Flag Quote & Reply

David Mantell
Member
Posts: 2220

>no memory of Naggers being bald until 1977.

He was bald and had the tattoo in December 1975 when Daddy got the mask off, although the ponytail was unplaited and messy back then.


(To squish one rumour - he still had the tattoo in '88 for the Brookside bout, although it had faded a bit by then.)

November 5, 2017 at 3:49 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Ron Historyo
Member
Posts: 1477

Now that you remind me yes , I had Forgotten that it was that match where perhaps we got the first proper view of him.

He had run from the ring a few times before that with long hair always hiding his face.

I saw him with long hair as early as 1971 in his car going home from Belle Vue.

Not often you are wrong David and this time you are right.

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HISTORYO

Time Detective and Multi Heritage Award Winner

November 5, 2017 at 4:06 PM Flag Quote & Reply

David Mantell
Member
Posts: 2220

>This film was on Youtube, about four years ago. Grainy then, I think posted by our former member friend NoStrOmo who won a very early quiz of ours. It was deleted. Looks like this is a film from screen of that grainy footage.

It;'s the Youtube video but I just saved it to hard-drive at the time,either via keepvid.com or by temp file fishing.  Probably the former.

November 5, 2017 at 6:46 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Ron Historyo
Member
Posts: 1477

In 1973 after Kendo's Windsford knockout of the Guardsman Crabtree , the results were not so clear cut with many mask rip offs with Kendo running from the ring. I think I saw Kendo v Daddy four times in about ten days in Lancashire. No fan was meant to be travelling so much. I think it was a Friday night in Liverpool and for sure a Sunday night in Blackpool that the mask came off or at least it was all mask pulling and Kendo fled. There was little wrestling and I felt cheated. It was then that I began to wonder exactly how many times wrestlers must have been meeting one another. Another trick was kendo was thrown a towel.


My own bill collection is now proving how much we were all taken in. These days I laugh about it.

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HISTORYO

Time Detective and Multi Heritage Award Winner

November 6, 2017 at 3:31 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Anglo Italian
Moderator
Posts: 1727

That's not The Rack, I'm afraid, Ron.


The Rack was a static move, a face bar not dissimilar from Skull Murphy's gaitor.  He started that only in America, so it couldn't have been in these two grainy 1971 bouts. 


Of course you are right about no beard, Ron.  I hadn't wanted to be too insistent but yes, the mask came up to the nose in every single bout.  Doh...


The cross arms off the ropes involved the opponent pinging back and forwards four feet each way. I remember when I first saw him use it against Judo Al Hayes in about 1967 it looked something special, though it does seem a bit tame now.

--

Still trying to work out what was going on!

November 6, 2017 at 4:08 AM Flag Quote & Reply

David Mantell
Member
Posts: 2220

Is the Rack the Crossface/Grapevine combination hold?  He used that on all sorts of people to get a first fall in the mid '70s - Daddy, Marino, McManus ...

November 6, 2017 at 6:12 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Ron Historyo
Member
Posts: 1477

What I was meaning was that the crossed arms capture after catapulting from the ropes was a bit of a stunner.

He followed up with the Rack while the man was weakened.

David says correctly a Crossface /Grapevine and I would add that there was a sort of arm bar in there as well.

It was executed very fast which sold the effect.

The airplane spin was magnificent but did not seem to stay with Kendo long. Maybe he got too dizzy himself.

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HISTORYO

Time Detective and Multi Heritage Award Winner

November 6, 2017 at 6:28 AM Flag Quote & Reply

David Mantell
Member
Posts: 2220

Bill Clarke also did the double handed chop for King Kendo.  It's actually a lot more effective thna a basic chop because you're using the other arm to guide your chopping arm.

November 6, 2017 at 8:18 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Anglo Italian
Moderator
Posts: 1727

"The crossed arms capture after catapulting from the ropes" was quite distinct from The Rack.  It was a stand alone move, not a prelude to anything else.  Anyway, it was in these 1971 bouts before Nagasaki had ever found his Rack.


If we want to get nostalgic to pre-tv Nagasaki, I think the most sensational and discussed aspect of his varied repertore then was coming down with the sword to within an inch of his opponents' nostrils.  This was deemed too much for his first tv appearance which we joined in Round Two.  I am wondering whether the magificently poised Judo Pete in the grainy image is the only remaining video of this as it was soon abandoned once George E. Gillette arrived.  I wonder whether something finally went wrong and a nostril was indeed cut upen?


I think the aeroplance spin gave way to the kamikaze roll.


Both the sword and the Kamikaze Roll required huge trust from the opponent:  I wonder what sort of relationship he really had with Judo Pete and the rest to get them to go along with both?  Must have been very close indeed,

--

Still trying to work out what was going on!

November 6, 2017 at 11:12 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Ron Historyo
Member
Posts: 1477

Yes two stand alone moves and maybe only on a few instances executed one after the other.

You are reminding me that The Rack came back from Canada.

Seem to remember Bridges stood up to the sword test on T.V. but damned if I can recollect who did it live when I was there.

As for trust and favorite Stable mates , remember like Bartelli , Naggers was Wryton through and through. Hence much repeated and practiced bouts with Billy Howes and many others.

My own belief is that Bartelli was well in with the promoters , so much so that Bartelli was allowed to help out old friends on the independant cicuit , maybe it was his suggestion and agreement with Wryton that Kendo was to be unbeaten. There is no way a newcomer could possibly be unbeaten without massive backing from somewhere. You are required to pay your dues.

Going back to the sword , although a good spectacle , I always thought "Just get on with the fight" so for me it was never missed.

One thing for sure with this thread , is that I am now unsure what I saw so many years ago , such is life. It is nearly fifty years ago that I am trying to recall. I guess the coloured costume was for T.V. and maybe the enhanced stripes but as I said I liked the original look.

--

HISTORYO

Time Detective and Multi Heritage Award Winner

November 6, 2017 at 1:34 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Anglo Italian
Moderator
Posts: 1727

On that I agree with you 100%, Ron.  Sixties Nagasaki was the real deal.  A real hard worker and great thinking wrestling brain.  The thinner the lines on  the mask, the better.


--

Still trying to work out what was going on!

November 6, 2017 at 4:56 PM Flag Quote & Reply

David Mantell
Member
Posts: 2220

>I always thought "Just get on with the fight" 


That was rather the point of that and the salt.  Way of getting heat by delaying things and urinating people off.

November 6, 2017 at 8:23 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Anglo Italian
Moderator
Posts: 1727

The Salt was only as good as the opponent exploited it to be.

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Still trying to work out what was going on!

November 7, 2017 at 2:49 PM Flag Quote & Reply

David Mantell
Member
Posts: 2220

The blue eye, in the 70s, 80s and 90s alike, would play along with the heat generated from all the delaying with the salt ceremony by loudly objecting to it being done and demanding an immediate start to the contest. George or Lloyd would then throw tantrums and threaten to withdraw Kendo from the match unless the ceremony was allowed to be performed.

November 7, 2017 at 6:35 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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